Category Archives: Networking

Map Network Drives in Windows 10

Below are the mapped network drive settings used with Linux and Unix. A valid Linux/Unix user/password must be used to map a drive to the Windows PC. The Windows PC will use the Windows user/password as the default. User should be set as administrator.

  • Drive Letter: R   Path: \\192.168.1.2\top (Used for UPS Worldship and FedEx Interface)
  • Drive Letter: S   Path: \\192.168.1.2\share
  • Drive Letter: T   Path: \\192.168.1.2\top_text
  • Drive Letter: U   Path: \\192.168.1.2\top_export
  • Drive Letter: V   Path: \\192.168.1.2\top_import
  • Drive Letter: W  Path: \\192.168.1.2\top_remote

Click on This PC  ->  Select the Computer Tab  ->  Click Map Network Drive

Select the drive letter to map or click on the down arrow to display the drive letters (i.e. S for share drive)

Enter one of the specified folders listed above (i.e. \\192.168.1.2\share)

Click Reconnect at sign-in  ->  Click Finish

 

Change IP Address on Lexmark Printers

Every printer has been assigned an IP address on the factory settings. To use a printer on your TOP network, you must change the IP address to an IP address in the 100 range – i.e. 192.168.1.101, 102, 103, etc.

You have a Printer Control Menu on the printer that you can use to print out a configuration page that will show all of the settings. You must change the TCP/IP settings to 192.168.1.1xx, Subnet Mask to 255.255.255.0, GW (Gateway) to 192.168.1.1. The printer should be set for DHCP.

For example, if the printer IP is preset to 192.168.1.228, you will access that IP address on your PC in your browser on the network in order to access the changes mentioned above or if your printer has a LCD panel, you can change the settings on the panel.

You can download the manual for your printer on www.lexmark.com in PDF format. There will be instructions on how to access the TCP/IP menu – i.e.  Network/Ports  –>  Standard Network  –>  Standard Network Setup  –>  TCP\IP.

Notes:

This menu is available only to network printers or printers attached to a print server.

Configure Printing To A Print Server

Configure printing directly to a print server instead of printing through a file server:

1.             Select Start

2.             Select Settings

3.             Select Printers

4.             Select Add Printer

5.             Select Next for Welcome to the Add Printer Wizard

6.             Select Local Printer

7.             Do not check Automatically detect and install my plug and play printer

8.             Select Next

9.             Select Create new port option

10.          Select Standard TCP/IP port for type

11.          Select Next

12.          Select Next for Welcome to the Add Standard TCP/IP Printer Port Wizard

13.          Enter printer IP address (print test page from JetDirect box to get IP address, example: 192.168.1.101)

14.          Port name will display below. If a 3 port print server is used, add a letter A thru C after the port name.

15.          Select Next

16.          Enter Device port (Parallel 1for single ports, Parallel 1, 2 or 3 for 3 port)

17.          Select Next

18.          Select Finish for Completing the Add Standard TCP/IP Printer Port Wizard

19.          Chose manufacturer and printer model

20.          Select Next

21.          Select printer name and printer default option

22.          Select Next

23.          Select Do not share the printer

24.          Select Next for Printer Sharing

25.          Select Next to print test page

26.          Select Finish

 

Install a printer in Windows 7 using an IP address

1. Click Start and select Devices and Printers.

2. Select Add a printer.

3. Select Add a local printer.

4. Select Create a new port.

5. Select Standard TCP/IP Port. Click Next.

6. Enter printer IP address in the Hostname or IP address (the Port name will default to the same IP address).

Windows 7 - Adding printer by IP address

7. Select the Query the printer and automatically select the driver to use option. Click Next.

8. Windows 7 should find the printer if the printer is on and configured correctly. You may have to specify more information. If prompted, Select the type of network adapter installed in the printer in the Device Type drop-down list. You can also click Custom to specify custom settings for the network printer. Click Next.

Mapping Network Drives For TOP

Below are the mapped network drive settings used with Linux and Unix. A valid Linux/Unix user/password must be used to map a drive to the Windows PC. The Windows PC will use the Windows user/password as the default.

  • Drive Letter: R   Path: \\192.168.1.2\top (Used for UPS Worldship and FedEx Interface)
  • Drive Letter: S   Path: \\192.168.1.2\share
  • Drive Letter: T   Path: \\192.168.1.2\top_text
  • Drive Letter: U   Path: \\192.168.1.2\top_export
  • Drive Letter: V   Path: \\192.168.1.2\top_import
  • Drive Letter: W  Path: \\192.168.1.2\top_remote

Link for how to map drives

Mapping Network Drives

Mapping a network drive provides a quick way to access the information on another computer on the network. You can share information just like it was on your own computer. If you frequently use information stored on another computer, mapping can save you time. Windows simplifies the process by assigning a letter to specify the location of the mapped drive. You can have access to a mapped drive each time you log on to the network.

Below are links on mapping a drive for different versions of Windows.

What Is Your IP?

My Two Cents, By Archie Tucker

Everything on your network has an IP address (Internet Protocol address), a unique identifier for each device, and is often needed during support issues. An IP address can be either dynamic or static. A static IP address doesn’t change. We normally setup your SonicWall, servers and printers using static IP addresses. Dynamic IP addresses are issued using a leasing system, which is normally maintained by your SonicWall. A dynamic IP address can change. To get your PC’s LAN IP address, you can use the ipconfig command from the DOS command prompt (instructions to access the DOS prompt). A LAN (Local Area Network) is a type of network, like the network in your office, the internet is a good example of a WAN (Wide Area Network). To get your WAN IP, you can enter www.whatismyip.com from your web browser. Normally, you would have a static WAN IP at your office (additional charge for static IP address) and a dynamic IP at your home.